A GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL TRAVEL
Introduction
Pre-Packing Prep
Packing Tips
Transportation Specific Tips
Planes
Trains
Automobiles

What To Pack: Packing Lists
Adventure Travel (Global Travel / Euro Rail)
Backpacking
Ski / Snowboard
Bike Touring
Fishing
Sea Kayaking
Canoeing
Car Camping

INTRODUCTION

Ok, it's official! The vacation is a "go," you've decided to take the much deserved time off to travel. As the big day approaches and the excitement continues to build, you are mentally going through in your head what you need and how to pack it. But, it has been a while since your last vacation and in recent months you have not been able to avoid hearing the news media discuss the advent of today's tighter, more unpredictable travel procedures. Fear not! It is not so bad. Surely things are different now, but different for good reason, and with the right planning, preparation and packing your trip can run as smooth as the freshly powdered ski slopes you are headed to. Here at EagleCreekLuggage we have a little thing called the "P's of Packing" just click on the the following text for more details : Proper Prior Planning Prevents Potential Problems! How true it is. With some help from your friends at EagleCreekLuggage all these unpredictable phantom travel nightmares become a little less daunting. Here are some pointers that can help you get ready for your trip. Remember, your vacation is meant to alleviate stress, not cause it!

**Please note: The following information most definitely applies to business travel too. The fact of the matter is that business travel is not nearly as exciting as vacation travel. Therefore, we took the liberty of using vacation travel as our focus under the assumption that people will understand this and apply the relevant information to their business travel as well. We apologize in advance for any confusion, but frankly, vacations really are much cooler…or hotter, depending on where you go...

HOW TO PACK

Pre-Packing Prep:
• The biggest tip we can give you is to plan ahead. Start putting a list together as far in advance as possible, so last minute packing stress is not an issue. Granted, with your busy schedule this sounds easier than it is, but any pre-packing preparation is better than frantically stuffing everything together at the last minute. Even if it means starting a packing list and pulling a couple pieces from that list before bed every night.

• Once you have confirmed your plans draw up a mental itinerary and start brainstorming the kinds of clothes (even down to specific outfits if possible) that you will need. Add these to your packing list. Knowing what you will be doing will help you plan what you will be wearing, which is a fairly important step in the packing process.

• Launder, dry-clean and hem beforehand! For one, it means that everything you take will be clean and tailored to fit. In other words, you're going to look great! In addition, having everything laid out in front of you will help you decide what you need/want to take and help prevent the "Oh, #!%$*! I forgot...". Finally, when clothes come out of the dryer, they are generally still warm and easy to fold with minimal wrinkles. Now is the time to choose your the shirts, blouses, pants and skirts and pack them. The Eagle Creek Pack-It® Folders are an excellent way to pack these items so they arrive at your destination free of wrinkles.

• Make sure all your documentation is current, valid and accounted for then find a safe, but accessible (to you), document organizer to put passports, visas, tickets and traveler's checks. Also, remember to hide photocopies of these documents in another spot. Another option if you will have internet access is to email scanned copies of all your documents to yourself so you have copies accessible online anytime.

• Identify all your luggage with tags. Label it both inside and out, with name and phone number and/or business card. Try to put a business address instead of your home (or no address at all if the airline doesn't require it) in the case that a thief wants to find out where his next business trip will be…

• Pre-pack toiletries, first aid kits, document/itinerary kits and miscellaneous items. Doing this in the initial stages of packing, when your brain is still functioning properly, means you will be less likely to forget important items. Also, once they're packed keep them packed so you know everything is ready to go for your next trip.

• When traveling with children make sure to pack a carry-on with activities to keep them entertained. Wrap small travel games, coloring books, puzzles etc. like mini presents (colored tissue paper is always good) and let them open one every hour, or half hour depending on attention spans.

• Carry all shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, lotion, etc. in small bottles, and never fill them to the very top since reduced pressure in airplane's cargo holds can cause them to explode. This will also help you conserve space in your toiletry kit.

• Bring a small sewing kit:
Vacations/business trips = excessive eating + minimal exercise = bursting buttons.

Packing Tips:
The Right Stuff…Your Luggage
• Hands down, the most important thing is to have functional, durable and comfortable luggage to accompany you on your trip. Remember, vacations don't come around all that often. In fact, they are a reward for all the hard work that you endure on a day to day basis, so as much as the vacation should be worry and hassle free, so too should your luggage.

• Make sure your luggage is functional and that it can accommodate the needs that your vacation/business itinerary demands. Extra pockets, sleeves, gussets, etc. will provide easy access convenience while in transit.

• Make sure your luggage is comfortable, that you are able to carry or wheel your pieces a good distance without causing any undo harm or discomfort. That means wheeled luggage should come with inline, recessed wheels and multi-position extendable handles so that the wheels roll and corner smoothly and won't hit your heels when you are on the go. Also, protective kickplates help a bag slide over stairs and curbs more easily and with less damage to your luggage.

• The most important thing for backpacks is that they should be adjusted to fit your specific torso length so the weight is distributed correctly and most comfortably. Depending on your journey, your backpack may be spending a lot of time on your back, so it is essential for both comfort and health reasons that it fit properly. In addition all wheeled, backpack and combination luggage should have side haul handles to allow for easy grabbing and hoisting onto conveyor belts, into cars, onto beds etc.

• Make sure your luggage is durable. Eagle Creek has plenty of super durable (lifetime warranty), well protected, lightweight, sturdy luggage options to make your travels worry-free and much more enjoyable.

Folders and Cubes and Sacs…
There are some great packing ideas out there these days, but when it comes down to simple, effective ways to pack you can't beat the Pack-It® System. With all the different colors and sizes of space- maximizing, wrinkle-minimizing folders, cubes and sacs, you have the freedom to pack as much or as little as you like in a way that suits your needs. So, whether you're packing a wheeled carry-on for the weekend, an X-Large duffel for a week, or an adventure backpack for two months there are Pack-It® products that will accommodate even the most discriminating packer's needs and keep you looking good and feeling good throughout the duration of your trip.

More Organisation = Less Time With Security:
When traveling, there are certain things that you have no control over - like random security searches. The key to making travel as hassle free as possible is to be prepared for such uncertainties so that when/if they do occur your experience will be as painless as possible. How you pack can often determine the speed at which you and your luggage can get to your destination, more specifically through security, so it is really important that you maximize use of space and organization when gearing up for your travels. A great way to do this is by using the Eagle Creek Pack-It® System. In addition to creating up to 20% more space and keeping clothes wrinkle free, organizing your clothes with the Pack-It® System can make bag searches at check-in or boarding gates run as smoothly as possible. When you do get flagged for a search, instead of having security wrestle through loose clothes leaving your luggage and it's contents looking like an unsuccessful yard sale, the Pack-It® System allows you to systematically organize and compartmentalize your clothing so any surprise searches are much faster, tidier and less stressful for both parties involved.

Wear More, Create Space:
Another way to maximize space, if you are traveling from a warm to cold climate, is to wear the heaviest and bulkiest items you have. Even if you have to suffer the warmth while in transit it'll free up a significant amount of room if you don't have to pack the bulky wool sweater and ski jacket in your luggage. However, make sure that if you are going from cold climate to warm you leave your heavy coat behind, either in the trunk of the car at the airport, or in an airport rental locker. Another option is to layer up with the clothing you've packed to get you through the short time you'll spend in the cold temperatures, that way you can leave the heavy stuff at home.

One For Me, One For You:
When traveling with a companion split up the heavy items. One takes the iron, the other the hair dryer, and so on and so forth.

TRANSPORTATION SPECIFIC - TRAVEL TIPS

Planes

Two is greater than one:
Due to airline weight restrictions you are now charged if your bag weighs over a certain amount (weight and fees vary among airlines). So instead of lugging that enormous duffle onto the bag scale only to find out what you already knew (from your inability to lift it), that you are going to be charged for exceeding the weight restriction, split one into two. Since you can check at least two bags with almost all airlines split that 40 kg Goliath into two 20 kg bags. Now you don't need to be Superman to lift your bags or Richie Rich to pay for them.

Plan ahead for overhead:
• Since not all airlines enforce the same rules, find out in advance what the regulations are for carry on items - size, contents, number. Prior knowledge will help you plan, in advance, exactly what you can and cannot bring aboard the plane. This will help you pack your bags in accordance to the size, content and number specifications of the airline and save time by preventing any unexpected hassles at security.

• Know what items are allowed on board. Here is a site that can help you identify what can and cannot be carried on the plane: http://www.frequentflyer.oag.com/traveller_services/carryonguide.asp

• When traveling with children strollers must be checked.

Handle with Care:
• All cameras, camcorders and film should be carried on. Know that such equipment is being carefully examined at security so allow some extra time. Checking such items can often be too rough on the equipment. These items should be carried with you, ideally in a protective case of some sort:

• Some airport security screeners can have ill affects on undeveloped film, so be sure to put such items, both checked and carry on, in protective pouches designed for these types of scanners.

• Carry and protect your laptop for the same reasons mentioned above.

• New domestic airport security screeners will not harm computer hard drives or floppies (scanners in small overseas airports might erase disks, so be sure to look in to this if it might be an issue), but be prepared to remove your laptop from its travel case so it can be x-rayed separately.

• Allow a little extra time for all laptop procedures, these may include booting up.

• When onboard it is safest to stow your laptop underneath the seat in front of you. If you do place it in the overhead, make sure it rests flat on the bottom of the bin.

• Label your laptop. Tape a business card or some other form of ID to the underside of your laptop to help prevent loss.

Trains

• Packing for train travel is a bit trickier. Unlike the airline industry, there are no universal guidelines that must be obeyed. As a result, there is a great deal of variety in train travel regulation depending on lines, countries and continents.

• If, for example, you are travelling in the US on Amtrak you are allowed two carry on pieces of up to 50 lbs each (not including purses or laptops). In addition you are allowed to check up to three bags not exceeding 50 lbs each. If you are checking bags make sure you have everything you need for the trip with you in your carry on because, like an airplane, once you check your bags you will not have access until you reach your destination.

• When traveling by Rail Europe (aka Eurorailing) you are allowed to bring as many carry-on bags as you can place underneath your seat or in the baggage rack above you. Some trains have special racks for baggage, but unless they were checked, you, and not the train line, are fully responsible for them. All excess baggage must be checked.

• Local commuter lines and shuttles will obviously have different regulations as well. So the best advice is to make sure you check with the transit company well in advance of your departure date to ensure hassle-free boarding.

A couple universal tips that can help make your train travel experience a lot smoother:
• Make sure you arrive at least 45 minutes prior to your departure. Trains are on point when it comes to arrival and departure times, especially in European countries like Germany and Switzerland. Do not plan on having a couple extra minutes to check your bags or decide whether you will have enough room to carry everything on. 3:00 departure means 3:00 departure, and that is with or without you and your luggage
.
• Remember to pack your camera and some high-speed film in your carry on (as well as any personal necessities and extra clothing in case something happens to you checked bags). Part of the fun of trains is in the surrounding landscape that you travel through and it would be terrible if you couldn't capture some of that on film.

Automobiles

• Packing for Car trips is the most variable of the three transportation modes, primarily because unlike planes or trains there are no rules or regulations (with the exception of state and federal laws) that determine how or what you pack in your car. You either own it or rent it, but while it's in your possession you control the packing space. Since cars come in all shapes and sizes there is also no standardized packing format that explains where to put what and why. In addition, people who travel in their own cars they tend to have a specific way that they like to pack their own car. It makes sense, if you own the car you probably have a good idea of how to pack it most efficiently, no argument here. Our goal is simply to provide you with a couple of pointers that you may or may not take into consideration when preparing for your next automotive adventure.

Pre-Trip Prep:
To better ensure your chances of a safe, comfortable, on time arrival at your destination, here are a couple of things to check before you leave:
1. Oil
2. Transmission Fluid
3. Brake Fluid
4. Brake Pads
5. Air Cleaner/Filter
6. Tire Pressure
7. Unusual wear on tires
8. Windshield wipers and wiper fluid
9. Lights (all of them)
10. Child Seat

Some forget-me-nots…:
1. Car Water - A container of tap water for the car.
2. Tool Set
3. Spare Tire(s)
4. Can of Fix-A-Flat - Works miracles on slow leaks and small punctures
5. Lug wrench and Jack
6. Hubcap Key
7. Duct Tape
8. A Bike Pump - Just in case…A last resort.
9. Jumper Cables
10. o Extra Fuses - Important but not so obvious.
11. Air Pressure Gauge
12. Motor Oil
13. Knife

Some Packing Pointer's:

Clean it up:
Before you start packing the car, go through it and get rid of anything that you won't need on your trip. This is especially important in the back or trunk. This is also a good time to check the trunk light, the spare tire and to make sure that the emergency kit is put someplace where it won't get buried.

Where are the directions?
Make sure you pack bags according to what and when you will need them. Bags that contain items you don't need until you've reached your destination should go in first and be packed underneath everything else. Items that you may need access to along the way should be packed against the car gate or back door like coolers, games, extra layers, pillows, blankets, etc. Finally, make sure you put together a bag of essential 'getting-there' items up front. Everything that you want to access without having to stop the car should be included -directions, maps, CD's, Books on Tape, cell phone, snacks, etc. This way you won't have to listen to one CD the whole trip or pull over every time you want to change it.

Can I borrow your shirt?
Spills are almost inevitable on long car trips, especially if you are traveling with children and MacDonald's is involved. Make sure you bring a bunch of moist towellettes, tissue and paper towels just in case.

Ice is nice:
Pack a small cooler. Fill it with drinks, snacks and treats for children and adults. It'll help reduce travel costs and make the trip a bit more fun. You'd be surprised at how many games you can come up with when you give each of your kids a different flavor of Goldfish for the trip.

A clean car is a happy car:
Bring small trash bags to keep the car clean. With the kids, the luggage, the food and the games you have enough stuff in the car, you don't need to add anything else, especially not trash. Throw out the bags at every gas stop. Also, having a couple of large zip locks can always come in handy for things like wet bathing suits, towels, diapers etc…

Keys for you, keys for me:
Spare yourself the inconvenience, cost and delay. Make sure you give an extra set of car keys to one of the other passengers…unless they are two.

Early to bed, early to drive:
Get your coffee, some juice and cereal for the kids and hit the road. If you leave early enough the kids will generally fall back asleep for a couple of hours, and you, fresh, from a good nights rest will be ready to go. Plus, there is something very peaceful about driving in the morning. Just remember to bring sunglasses if you are heading East (or when driving West at sunset).

Avoid delays:
When scheduled to hit major cities along the way try to plan around rush hours, and other events that may cause congestion (i.e. sporting events). Even if it means leaving earlier, leaving later or pulling over for a decent meal, you can easily make up the time once the congestion is over, and save yourself the frustration and road rage that builds when you are stuck on traffic.

WHAT TO PACK

Now that some of the more general packing tips have been covered, let's get to the exciting stuff. What to pack? These days there are countless ways to spend your hard earned vacation time. Everyone has a different idea of the perfect vacation. Since us 'Eagle Creeker's' take our adventure travel very seriously, we like to look at our vacations as adventures which run the gamut from outdoor exploration to immersion in foreign cultures. The variety is endless, and packing lists will depend totally on the purpose and destination of your vacation. In an effort to try to help you out, we have put together a list of popular vacation types and some corresponding top line packing lists to help you get organized and make your trip prep a little bit easier.

ADVENTURE TRAVEL (Global Travel / Euro Rail)

Gear:
• Convertible Backpack
• Packing Accessories
• Sleeping Bag (optional)
• Inflatable Pillow

Clothing:
• Walking/Hiking Shoes (broken in)
• Dress Shoes (optional)
• Sandals
• Flip Flops
• Hiking Socks and Regular Socks

Men's Clothing:
• 3 T-shirts
• 2 Synthetic shirts (Short and Long)
• Fleece Jacket
• Travel Pants
• Underwear
• Shorts
• Khakis
• "Night on the Town" outfit
• Bathing Suit
• Sun Hat

Accessories/Misc:

• Money Belt
• Camera, Film
• Camcorder
• Laptop
• CD/MP3 Player
• Global Cell Phone
• Outlet Adapters
• Currency Converter
• Guide Books
• Personal Book
• Journal/Diary
• Bandanna
• Cards
• Water Bottles
• Batteries
• Flashlight
• Comfort Travel Pillow
• Sewing Kit
• Matches or Lighter
• Portable locks (Luggage and Door)
• Clothespins
• Safety Pins
• Sink Plug
• Pocket Knife
• Headlamp/Flashlight
• US $ Bills
• Travel Alarm Clock
• Hardcopies and Photocopies of Passport, Visa, ID's, etc.
• Umbrella
Women's Clothing (in addition to above):
• Blouse
• Leggings
• 2 or 3 Skirts
• Wedding Ring - can help if you're traveling alone

Toiletries:

• Towel
• TP
• Water Purification (iodine or filter)
• Motion Sickness meds
• Prescriptions
• Ibuprofen
• Diarrhea Meds
• First Aid Kit
• Bug Repellent
• Lip Balm
• Sunscreen
• Ear Plugs
• Eye Shades
• Toothbrush/Toothpaste
• Soap
• Shaving Gear
• Feminine Products
• Floss
• Deodorant
• Travel Bottles

BACKPACKING

Gear:
• Backpack (3,500 - 5,000 cubic inches depending on length of trip)
• Sleeping Bag (generally bags rated 20 - 30 degree F are sufficient, but it depends on your destination)
• Packing Accessories
• Tent
• Sleeping Pad
• Inflatable Pillow

 

Clothing:
• Rain Gear (Top and Bottoms; preferably breathable)
• Wool or Fleece Sweater or Jacket
• Hat (sun and Fleece or Wool)
• Gloves or Mittens
• Boots (waterproofed and worn in)
• Camp Shoes (sandals or sneakers)
• Hiking Socks (liners optional)
• Long Underwear Tops and Bottoms
• Shorts (1)
• Underwear (1)
• T-shirt (1)
Accessories:
• First Aid Kit (Extra Moleskin and other Blister Repair)
• Rope
• Garbage Bags
• Rain Covers
• Zip Locks
• Bathroom Shovel
• Headlamp
• Batteries
• TP
• Paper Towel
• Maps
• GPS and/or Compass
• Toiletries incl.: Sunscreen, Lip Balm,
Toothbrush, Toothpaste
• Pocket Knife
• Rip stop Tape
• Bug Repellent
• Whistle

Kitchen - Food & Water:

• Water Bottles - 2 liter bottles or more
• Purification (iodine or filter)
• Matches and Lighter
• Stove
• Fuel
• Kitchen Kit
• Knife
• Bowl and Spoon
• Hot Drink Mug

Luxury Items (Optional):

• Camp Chair
• Sunglasses
• Diary/Journal
• Book
• Camera and Film
• Waterproof Ground Cloth
• Tarp
• Food Strainer
• French Press Coffee Maker and Ground Coffee

SKI / SNOWBOARD

Toiletries:
• LIP BALM!!!
• SUNSCREEN!!!
• Oral accessories: Toothbrush, Toothpaste, Floss, etc.
• Contacts/Glasses
• Prescriptions
• Feminine Products
• Shaving Accessories
• Ibuprofen

Equipment:
• Skis and/or Snowboard
• Boots
• Poles
• Glove/foot warmers

Clothing:

At the Mountain:
• Outer Layers- Parka and Pants/Bibs
• Additional Outer Jacket (Night Use and Mountain Substitute)
• Sweaters and/or Fleece
• Fleece Vest (optional)
• Long Underwear (No Cotton!) - Top and Bottom
• Socks (No Cotton!)
• Helmet
• Hat
• Goggles (no fog)
• Sunglasses
• Gloves and/or Mittens
• Glove/Mitten Liners
• Neck Gator and/or Face Mask

Off-Slope:
• Pants
• Shirts
• Boots
• Shoes (regular, workout and HOT TUB sandals)
• Bathing Suit
• Workout Clothes
• Underwear
• Socks

BIKE TOURING

Gear:
• Tent
• Sleeping Bag (minimum zero degrees C rating should work fine)
• Sleeping Pad
• Ground Tarp (optional)
• Inflatable Pillow

Kitchen - Food & Water:
• Food and Water:
• Water Bottles - 2 litre bottles or more
• Purification (iodine or filter)
• Matches and Lighter
• Stove
• Fuel
• Kitchen Kit
• Knife
• Bowl and Spoon
• Hot Drink Mug

Clothing:
• Weatherproof Jacket
• Rain Gear (Tops and Bottoms)
• Waterproof Gloves or Mittens
• Shoe Covers
• Gaiters
• Face and Neck Protectors (Gaiters, Masks)
• Helmet
• Helmet Liner
• Warm Hat
• Sunglasses/Goggles
• Toe Covers
• Synthetic Long Underwear (Top and Bottom)
• 2 or 3 T-Shirts
• Riding Gloves
• Shorts
• Underwear
• Biking Shorts
• Long Sleeve Wicking Shirt
• Fleece or Sweatshirt
• Bathing Suit
• Pants
• Athletic Tights
• Socks
• Cycling Shoes
• Camp Shoes
• Sandals

Accessories:

• First Aid Kit (Extra Moleskin and other Blister Repair)
• Rope
• Garbage Bags
• Rain Covers
• Zip Locks
• Bathroom Shovel
• Headlamp
• Batteries
• TP
• Paper Towel
• Maps
• GPS and/or Compass
• Toiletries incl.: Sunscreen, Lip Balm, Toothbrush, Toothpaste
• Pocket Knife
• Rip stop Tape
• Bug Repellent
• Whistle
• Signal Mirror
• Book
• Journal/Diary
• Pen

Repair Gear:

• Spare Tubes
• Tire Levers
• Patch Kit
• Rear Derailleur Pulley
• Spokes
• Come Wrench
• Allen Wrenches
• Nuts and Bolts
• Balling Wire
• Spare Chain Lin
• Boot Material
• Duct Tape
• Schrader Tube Valve Cap (for Schrader Valves)
• Air Gauge
• Channel Locks
• Spoke Wrench
• Chain Rivet Tool
• Screwdriver Kit
• Six-inch Crescent Wrench

FISHING

Fishing Gear :
• 2 Rods (at least 2, in case one breaks)
• Reel
• Extra Spools
• Line (Floating and Sinking)
• Flies (Assortment of Dry, Nymph and Streamer)
• Fly Boxes
• Leaders
• Tipper Material
• Tin Shot
• Wading Belt
• Fishing Vest
• Net
• Polarized Glasses
• Glasses Magnifiers
• Flashlight
• Batteries
• Snips
• Forceps
• Fly Floatant/Shake
• Sun block
• Bug Spray
• Fishing Bag
• Water Duffel

Clothing:
• Rain Gear (tops and Bottoms)
• Long Underwear (synthetic)
• Fleece Jacket
• Heavy Long Sleeve Shirt
• Short Sleeve Microfiber Shirt
• Microfiber Shorts
• Zip Away Pants
• Neoprene Gloves or Fingerless Gloves
• Hat
• Socks
• Wading Socks
• Gravel Guards
• Breathable Lightweight Waders (Fleece and Long Underwear layers to wear underneath in colder weather/water)
• Wading Boots
• Wading Sandals (for wet wading)

SEA KAYAKING

Gear :
• Kayak
• PFD (Life vest) with whistle, knife, fire starter attached.
• Paddle(s)
• Spray Skirt
• Bilge Pump
• Bailer and Sponge
• Deck-mounted Compass
• Waterproof Deck Bag
• Cockpit Cover
• Bow Line

Kitchen - Food and Water:
• Water Bottles - 2 liter bottles or more
• Purification (iodine or filter)
• Matches and Lighter
• Stove
• Fuel
• Kitchen Kit
• Knife
• Bowl and Spoon
• Hot Drink Mug

Clothing:
• Camp Clothes
• Thermal Stretch Suit - Wet or Dry depending on conditions
• Synthetic Underwear
• Fleece Jacket
• Paddle Jacket
• Warm Hat
• Neoprene Gloves
• Neoprene Booties
• Nylon Pants
• Nylon Shirt
• Sunglasses
• Bandana
• Camp Shoes
• Camp Socks

Safety Equipment:

• First Aid Kit
• Paddle Float
• Signal Mirror
• Meteor Flares
• Strobe
• VHF Radio
• Knife
• Tow Line
• Whistle
• Parachute Flares
• Rescue Banner
• Anchor
• Barometer

Navigation/Tools:

• Charts
• Chart Case
• Tide Table
• Handheld Compass or GPS
• Map Measurer
• Tool Kit
• Leatherman
• Channel Lock Pliers
• Wire Cutters
• Duct Tape
• Electrical Tape
• Spare Rudder Cable and Fittings
• Spare Seat Bolts
• Nylon Cord
• Seam Grip
• Small U-Shackles
• Single Edged Razor Blades
• Fiberglass Repair Kit
• Deck Bungees
• Spare Hatch Straps
• Expedition Repair Kit

Camp Gear:
• Tent
• Ground cloth
• Sleeping Bag
• Sleeping Pad
• Inflatable Pillow
• Tarp

Miscellaneous:

• Flashlight
• Batteries
• Binoculars
• Field Guides
• Fishing Gear
• Snorkeling Gear
• Headlamp
• Diary/Journal and Pen
• Camera and Equipment
• Bear/Insect Repellent
• Waterproof Bags and Containers

CANOEING

Gear :
• Canoe
• PFD
• Compass
• GPS
• Bow and Stern Ropes
• Karabiners
• Bailer
• Throw bags
• Paddle(s)
• Gear straps
• Kneepads
• Seat pads
• Spray cover
• Pump

Kitchen Gear:
• Stove
• Fuel
• Dish Washing Set
• Water Basin
• Pots, Cutlery, Mugs, Bowls, Pots, Pans
• Condiments
• Plastic Trowel
• Garbage Bags

Clothing:
• Rain Gear (Top and Bottoms)
• Wetsuit or Drysuit, Paddling Jacket or Pants depending on location
• Paddling Gloves
• All Weather Footwear
• Wetsuit Booties
• Fleece Jacket and Bottoms
• Light Nylon Pants
• Shorts
• Quick Dry Light Long sleeve Shirt
• Warm Hat
• Helmet
• Sunhat
• Synthetic Long Underwear
• Socks
• Hiking Boots
• Camp Shoes
• Underwear

Safety Equipment:

• First Aid Kit
• Paddle Float
• Signal Mirror
• Meteor Flares
• Strobe
• VHF Radio
• Knife
• Tow Line
• Whistle
• Parachute Flares
• Rescue Banner
• Anchor
• Barometer

Tools & Repair:

• Saw
• Awl
• Wire, strong cord
• Seat hanger bolts and nuts, gunwale screws
• Leatherman Wave
• Duct Tape
• Drysuit Gaskets
• Fiberglass cloth, resin, hardener, applicator, rubber gloves, plastic wrap
• Epoxy
• Sandpaper
• Gear Aid Kit
• Zipper Sliders, hip belt buckle

Camp Gear:
• Tent
• Ground cloth
• Sleeping Bag
• Sleeping Pad
• Inflatable Pillow
• Tarp

Miscellaneous:

• Earplugs
• Bug Repellent
• Toiletries
• Sunglasses
• Sunscreen
• Lip Balm
• Toilet Paper
• Wash Kit
• Water Bottle(s)
• Water Purifiers
• Camera, Film, Lens
• Batteries
• Binoculars
• Headlamp
• Matches or Lighter
• Knife

CAR CAMPING

Gear :
• Ground Cloth
• Tent(s)
• Sleeping Pads
• Portable Chairs and Stools
• Sleeping Bags
• Travel Pillows
• Screen House (optional)

Kitchen Gear:
• Stove
• Fuel
• Charcoal (pre-soaked)
• Firewood and Kindling
• Matches and Lighter
• Cooking Pots and Pans (i.e. Dutch Oven)
• Water Bladder
• Utensil Sets
• Mess Kits
• Coolers
• Ice
• Dish Detergents
• Dish Towels
• Sponge
• Plastic Washing Basin
• Paper Towels
• Napkins
• Tablecloth
• Trash Bags
• Aluminum Foil
• Can Opener
• Plastic Wrap
• Zip-Locks
• Hot Pads
• Citronella Candles

Tools:

• Rope
• Clothes Pins
• Duct Tape
• Saw
• Hammer
• Knife
• Leatherman
• Hand Broom

Clothing:
• Rain Gear
• Jacket
• Fleece Layers
• Pants or Sweats
• Shorts
• T-Shirts
• Long sleeve Shirts
• Long Underwear (synthetic)
• Underwear
• Sweatshirts
• Sun Hats
• Sunglasses
• Warm hat
• Gloves
• Camp Shoes
• Socks

Food:
• Snacks
• Fruit
• Peanut Butter and Bread
• Butter
• Cooking Oil
• Condiments
• Beverages
• Breakfast Food
• Lunch Food
• Dinner
• Coffee
• Tea
• Hot Chocolate
• Milk and Sugar
• Desserts
• S'mores

Safety Equipment:

• First Aid Kit
• Paddle Float
• Signal Mirror
• Meteor Flares
• Strobe
• VHF Radio
• Knife
• Tow Line
• Whistle
• Parachute Flares
• Rescue Banner
• Anchor
• Barometer

Play Equipment:

• Swim Towels
• Bathing Suits
• Water Shoes
• Hiking Shoes
• Daypacks
• Water Bottles
• Camera and Film
• Books
• PFD's
• Guidebooks
• Maps
• Camping Reservation Info
• Outdoor Toys
• Whistles (One Per Child)
• Board Games
• Cards
• Kites
• Water Toys

Miscellaneous:

• First Aid Kit
• Toiletries
• Lantern (One per tent)
• Flashlights
• Headlamps